Thank you for your comments and messages. They are appreciated. And thanks for buying the album. Here are a few notes about the music:

I like the way the album begins. A single melody line, without accompaniment. The song title is a hint. “Black Rose” uses the same chord structure as “La Rosa Negra”, from “Borrasca”. I called the idea “RePLay” – like Re-Use or Recycle. Same chords, new melodies and arrangement.
The same is true for “Uma Dança”. The chords are from “Dancing Alone”, from the album “Dune”.

“Saudade” – I already mentioned Jon’s beautiful bowed bass work on that piece in an earlier post. The piece starts with a chorus that plays 3/4 against 4/4. During the chorus the rhythm guitar on the right side accents the waltz, which also makes that part sound a little slower, since three beats per bar move more slowly than four beats per bar. I love the way the melody stretches forward and starts to play ahead of the beat at 2’45”, before rejoining the beat at 2’53”. I added the section that starts at 4’05” to feature the bowed bass and because I wanted to hear more of it.

I already mentioned “Uma Dança”. I love the way the piece shifts into high gear at 2’14”, love the low harmony melody guitar at 2’39”, love the way the cajon, on the left, urges the music on while the djembe, on the right, sounds relaxed, and the way the bass holds everything together. I like that this last section is too short and that I want to hear more of it every time I listen to it – even after a hundred times it feels too short.

The fourth new piece is “The Sea Between”. A couple of friends expressed that they felt this piece might be the sleeper of the album. The stereo introduction was a surprise. I performed the part, a tremolo played by three fingers while the melody was played with the thumb, a couple of times and when I listened to the recording decided they might overlap nicely if panned left and right. Most of the time it sounds as if only one tremolo is playing and only briefly can one hear that these are actually two tremolo parts that happen to line up very well.