I read this item regarding Netflix and privacy on Tuesday Morning.

In the Afternoon I walked into town and rented a couple of movies from the local video rental place, which is celebrating 28 years in business this year. I was a member in the Eighties and I renewed my membership last Spring. It’s an old-fashioned store. Accounts are kept on note-cards, there is no computer, one has to walk around and discover the movies, but the selection is good. I haven’t cancelled my Netflix account, yet, but it seems likely that I will. Netflix works well and is easy, but this little local store is more to my liking, and is just an easy bike-ride away.

For dinner I made a salad of lettuce, carrots and raisins, although dates might have been better instead of the raisins. For the dressing I used a food processor, in which I combined the juice of one lemon, about 1/2 cup of olive oil, a handful Italian parsley, three cloves of garlic, salt and pepper. When the salad was done, I sprinkled some toasted sesame seeds on it. I had not used parsley like that, but after reading about a different sauce-recipe in a book of Ottoman cuisine, I decided it might work in a dressing. I really liked the flavor.

After dinner I watched the movie Silk. Not a great movie, but the visuals were beautiful and I concentrated on that. I read the book a year ago. The book is very poetic and worth reading.

In November the band will play in Japan. Dates to follow. We will be in Yokohama and Tokyo for a week. I am quite excited about it!

Would love to see Lovegrove’s solar trees at the MAK in Vienna, if I can find the time.

Naturally this item made me chuckle:

Five possibilities for the future of Facebook | Web Services | Macworld
Social networking will eventually plateau, skid, and fall off a cliff. Users will abandon ship, just as they did with MySpace, tired of scanning pointless Twitter-like status updates, step-by-step progress through silly games, and pictures of vacations you will never, ever take. Without a great deal of innovation and progressive thought, Facebook could find itself staring at a brick wall with no direction home to the simple glory days before 300 million turned into 600 million.