Trent Reznor: Why won’t people pay $5? | Tech news blog – CNET News.com
If I think of it a month later walking through Amoeba (record store), hmm…do I want to just buy a piece of plastic and give most of the money to the record labels, who have to be thieves because my experience with them has always been that? And you have a lot of reasons why you didn’t do it. So I thought if you take all those away and here’s the record in as great a quality as you could ever want, it’s available now and it’s offered for an insulting low price, which I consider $5 to be, I thought that it would appeal to more people than it did. That’s where my sense of disappointment is in general, that the idea was wrong in my head and for once I’ve given people too much credit.

And:

It kind of gets into the bigger picture that you’ve had to face as a musician over the last few years, which in my mind was a bitter pill to swallow, but it’s pretty far down the hatch with me now: the way things are, I think music should be looked at as free. It basically is. The toothpaste is out of the tube and a whole generation of people is accustomed to music being that way. There’s a perception that you don’t pay for music when you hear it on the radio or MySpace.

There’s a difficult transition in the mind of the musician and certainly in the mind of the record label. If that is the case, how does one adapt to that?

For me, I choose the battles I can fight. In my mind, I think if there was an ISP tax of some sort, we can say to the consumer, “All music is now available and able to be downloaded and put in your car and put in your iPod and put up your a– if you want, and it’s $5 on your cable bill or ISP bill.”

Someone asked me recently whether I’ve used 4-1-1 lately. I said ‘Not really.” They said do you know you’re paying for that every month? ‘I am?’ Yeah, X-amount of your money goes to a service that you don’t even use.’

Which takes us back to this and this and this entry in this Diary. Hm, I haven’t used 411 in years…