Rode the Mariachi Bullitt (((AKA the sexy beast))) to breakfast with Jon. It was great to eat outside on the patio. A light breeze fanned us and moved the leaves, and as always the birds were hanging around to scavenge food.
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Robert Johnson revelation tells us to put the brakes on the blues | Music | guardian.co.uk
And now, nearly 50 years after Columbia first packaged his work as King of the Delta Blues, we discover that we’ve been listening to these immortal songs at the wrong speed all along. Either the recordings were accidentally speeded up when first committed to 78, or else they were deliberately speeded up to make them sound more exciting. Whatever, the common consensus among musicologists is that we’ve been listening to Johnson at least 20% too fast. Numerous bloggers have helpfully slowed down Johnson’s best-known work and provided samples so that, for the first time, we can hear Johnson as he intended to be heard.

Twenty percent! This Morning Jon and I figured that twice the speed means an octave higher. 20% would mean a fifth of an octave or, 12 half-tone steps divided by 5 = 2.4 half-ton steps, or a whole note plus a quarter. In other words, quite a bit. Should be very interesting to this new version. I am looking forward to buy the CD!

Jon and I laughed about this:

Robert Johnson revelation tells us to put the brakes on the blues | Music | guardian.co.uk
When Kind of Blue was first released on CD it received ecstatic reviews despite the fact that Miles Davis’ trumpet was at the wrong speed on half the tracks.

Well, if only the trumpet was presented at the wrong speed I think EVERYONE would have noticed it!!! But, of course the whole band was at the wrong speed, which was harder to detect.

Well, I don’t know about you, but I’d prefer to hear an album as it was meant to be heard, rather than a version birthed by a studio muppet flicking the wrong switches as he lights up another jazz woodbine

Studio muppet? Really? Journalists (rolls eyes).
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I love these!!!

Architectural Model Greeting Cards by Terada Architects | Spoon & Tamago
Speaking of Kaminokousakujo, another one of their latest products are these awesome greeting cards (580 yen) created from paper figures often used in architectural modeling.

And check out this:

How to accurately communicate the intensity of your apology:

1. momentarily-held 10-degrees (“gosh, was that your toe I trod on?”)
2. briefly-held 25-degrees (“sorry, we’ve run out of tuna”)
3. 2-second, 45 degrees (“I know you’re the Best Man, but the flight is canceled”)
4. 5-second 45 degrees (“I’ve just backed over your dog, boss”)
5. 20-second 90 degrees (“our widget blinds kids”)
6. and the “dogeza” kneel on the floor (“evacuate your village, the plant is exploding”)

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Running on Empty is the title of this video on Vimeo:

Velorution comments:

Velorution
Look at these great cycle lanes, ready for use in LA.

Did you know that roads were originally paved for bicycles, not for cars?
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We need to make changes. I think that much is crystal clear. But we are not willing to get started.

There is a great German saying: Nach mir die Sintflut. This translation reads: It doesn’t matter what happens when I’ve gone , but it really says something like: After I’m gone the flood can come.

That sums up our culture well, I think. It won’t affect me. There will be enough water for me. The next generations can deal with it. And so on. Short-sighted.

If you are not angry, you haven’t paid attention.

See this comment about where to direct your outrage. Thanks marijose.